History · quilting · sewing

The Oregonian Modernistic Quilt – Block #4

July 30, 1933

Block No. 4 – The Oriental Poppy

(text)

This is block No. 4 of the modernistic flower quilt. The flower it portrays is singularly suitable for a quilt since the poppy is traditionally associated with sleep. This is the cultivated variety, the oriental poppy, and certainly its narcotic quality is not connected with its color, which is most rousing scarlet.

The flower is in three parts, two of them overlapped by the largest, with its cup holding yellow dots. The stitching outlining the curl of the petals and on the leaf is also yellow.

The double leaf stems and the upper part of the bud are green. The section at the lower end of the bid is scarlet.

The triangle to the right of the leaf is yellow. The large half-circle at the left is green and the circle it partially covers is scarlet. The three remaining dots, in order of size, are, largest, green, yellow and scarlet.

Material: satin, sateen, percale, gingham or felt.

Colors: solid, decided colors, even in lighter shades. The green may be uniform throughout. Colors repeated from the flower proper in design insets should be identical with the colors in the flower. The spots are part of the design and for balance the color suggestions for each should be closely followed. You own taste may lead you to color combinations different but equally good. Avoid, however, the possibility of getting too much of any one color into the quilt, black flower blocks and buff quilting blocks are recommended. Alternatives are buff for both or black for both.

Method: preferably applique; allow one-half inch for turning on the blocks, one-quarter inch elsewhere. You can use wax or paint, but only with a light background. In appliqueing use an invisible hemstitch, except for buttonholing on parts too small to handle otherwise.

Further details appear with the all-over pattern

Next week: The Nasturtium

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